hardknocks365 May 17, 2019

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It’s only fitting to start with the guy making his UFC debut. Charles “Air” Jourdain is a very promising 23-year-old fighter, who was already a featherweight champion in his domestic TKO promotion. Won the title in December vs former champion Alex Morgan with a guillotine choke in the first round. That one was actually set up by a great spinning backfist that hurt his opponent and sent him to the mat. Last month he was scheduled to fight the champion of the lightweight division Ronson in an attempt to become a champ-champ. But unfortunately that fight was scratched, so he fought Damien Lapilus instead and won by TKO in the 5th round. Soon after that he signed with UFC and announced that he’ll compete in 155 division.

Desmond Green is definitely more experienced of the two. 29-year-old has 3 times as many fights as Jourdain in his career (22-8) and is on UFC roster for almost two years now. He’s not that unfamiliar with Canada either, as he was working out at Tristar Gym with GSP before he made a move to Hard Knocks 365 in Florida. He’s working with some of the best there like new welterweight champion Kamaru Usman. He is extremely motivated to do well in this Rochester card because he was born here and wrestled for the University of Buffalo which is not far away.

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Ed Herman isn’t done yet, but he’s got a plan for what’s after fighting
For Desmond Green, a short turnaround is worth the effort for the chance to fight in front of a home crowd.

“The Predator” is coming off of a first-round TKO win over the newly-retired Ross Pearson, his first stoppage victory in the UFC. Just a month and a half later, he’ll step into the cage with UFC debutant Charles Jourdain at UFC Fight Night 152 in Rochester, New York on Saturday, May 18.

The Rochester native will be looking to feed off the energy of his hometown crowd in order to put together his first UFC winning streak.

Before his fight, Green talked to John Hyon Ko of The Body Lock about his evolution as a fighter, past issues with opponents and what it’s like to finally enjoy home-field advantage in the UFC.

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Mike Trizano isn’t interested in the trash-talking side of the game. He lets his performances speak for themselves.

Unlike some of the other cast members on the show, the Ultimate Fighter 27 lightweight winner wasn’t much of a character. He didn’t need to be.

Trizano defeated Thailand Clark and John Gunther to land a spot in the finale against Joe Giannetti. He came into that fight a slight underdog, but he exited with the TUF trophy and a UFC contract.

After his most recent win against Luis Pena, Trizano made the decision to drop down to featherweight, and he will make his 145-pound debut at UFC Fight Night 152 against Grant Dawson.

Before the fight, Trizano spoke with John Hyon Ko of The Body Lock about training at Tiger Schulmann’s Martial Arts, his approach to fighting and the task at hand in Rochester, New York.

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If you thumb through Nik Lentz’ Instagram page, the eighth image in his array is a fan-made fight poster announcing his trilogy bout with Charles Oliveira this weekend in Rochester, New York.

Above the myriad hashtags affixed to the post is a message from the 34-year-old lightweight, who enters the contest on a two-fight winning streak. It reads, “I’ve been telling everyone… I’m a new person. New faith, new father, new man. I get a chance to prove it.”

A cynical person would say it’s a personal spin on the same old pre-fight promises of being in the best shape ever, training camp going perfectly and feeling ready to take on all comers, but to hear Lentz chronicle the twists and turns and milestone moments that led him to this point in his life, you come to understand that the unflinchingly honest and refreshingly open veteran really is in a different place.

All it took for him to get here was to stop caring about fighting so damn much.

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Vicente Luque will quickly shift his focus from a veteran of the Octagon to a fighter making his promotional debut Saturday at UFC Rochester.

UFC newcomer Derrick Krantz will replace Neil Magny in Saturday’s co-main event against Luque, according to FloCombat’s Nolan King.

Krantz’s team confirmed the news in an Instagram post.

Magny was forced to withdraw from his welterweight matchup after failing a drug test Saturday, he announced on Instagram.

Krantz (24-10) is a former Legacy Fighting Alliance welterweight champion and makes his promotional debut with seven wins in his last eight fights, and is coming off a first-round TKO victory over Justin Patterson at LFA 63 in March. The 30-year-old has fought some tough competition, including current interim lightweight champion Dustin Poirier, Andrey Koreshkov, and UFC welterweight Alex Morono.

Luque (15-6-1) is riding a four-fight win streak which includes a TKO victory over Bryan Barberena at UFC on ESPN 1 in February. The Hardknocks 365 product has gone 8-2 during his UFC career, with all of those victories coming via stoppage.

England’s Danny Roberts steps back into the octagon on Saturday night for the first time since his controversial loss to Claudio Silva at UFC Fight Night: London in March.

The welterweight, who fights out of Liverpool like Darren Till and Molly McCann, moved to 16-4 after his loss to the Brazilian, but the decision is largely accepted to be the wrong one.

Officially, the result says Roberts loss via armbar in the third round and the referee made the decision believing Roberts verbally signalled his submission.

He seemed to be the only person in the O2 who saw it that way. talkSPORT caught up with Roberts ahead of his battle against UFC debutant Michel Pereira on Saturday and asked what exactly happened last time.

“Simply put, it was a hard-fought fight,” Roberts started. “And there was a few moments throughout the fight before the ending came where you could say there was a little bit of politics with it. I did not submit. I did not verbally submit. I didn’t submit in any kind of way. At the time, I could hear Claudio [Silva] talking to the ref and encouraging him, so it’s just something where it’s a fight, you know? It’s between me and him and it doesn’t really involve that third party.

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Ottawa, ON — Derek Brunson needed a win at UFC Ottawa. Make no mistake about it. Heading into the Fight Night show in the rainy Canadian capital over the weekend, Brunson was 2-4 in his last six fights. On a two fight losing streak. Still in the co-main event, against Elias Theodorou. But in dire need of a victory to stay relevant.

Yes, his losses had come to top names. Jacare Souza. Anderson Silva. Israel Adesanya. Brunson had made adjustments as a result, moving at least partially to Hard Knocks 365 in Florida, under the tutelage of Henri Hooft. Brunson spoke about all that beforehand.

In the end, the change paid off. But perhaps what was most notable was that Brunson proved he was more than just a knockout artist.

“I’m a knockout guy. In my previous wins, I think all of my last seven wins, I got knockouts in the first round,” Brunson told reporters including Cageside Press following UFC Ottawa.

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After losing two in a row and four of his last six, the new Hard Knocks 365 representative was in peril of being tossed aside. Brunson had to dig deep, do a little soul searching and change some things up in his life or else he was in jeopardy of not fighting in the Octagon again. MMA is a what-have-you-done-for-me-lately sport, and losing two in a row via knockout is not a spot any fighter wants to be in. So Brunson did what he needed to and reversed course to back in the winner’s circle.

“I switched up my training camp and moved to Hard Knocks 365,” he said after he toppled Theodorou via unanimous decision. “I think that made a big difference in this fight. They prepared me so well down there and told me exactly what he was going to do, so I felt confident coming in here.”

The duel with Theodorou wasn’t exactly the greatest fight in the history of the UFC, but Brunson did more than enough to earn the win. The North Carolinian tried goading his foe into a fire fight, but Theodorou played it safe throughout their 15 minutes, leaving plenty to be desired in terms of action. But, Brunson said, it wasn’t his fault; he tried bringing the proverbial heat.

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CHICAGO — Patricio Freire will look to become a Bellator two-weight champion on Saturday night, but he thinks the fight against Michael Chandler should have happened much sooner.

Freire, the Bellator featherweight titleholder, meets Chandler, the lightweight champ, in the Bellator 221 main event at the Allstate Arena in Chicago, IL, USA, for Chandler’s title. “Pitbull” is looking forward to winning a second belt — and especially to simply getting his hand raised against Chandler — but he believes the promotion could have booked this bout far sooner than it did.

“It’s a fight I believe should have happened a long time ago,” Freire told Bloody Elbow on Wednesday. “Perhaps Bellator and Viacom were waiting for him to get have the belt back and some of his shine back to make this fight finally happen. But I think they missed some opportunities to do it before.”

Freire and Chandler have gone back and forth for years on social media and in interviews. Both are two of Bellator’s biggest faces for the company and their fight is looked at as one of the biggest in the promotion’s history. But after multiple requests to fight Chandler, the Brazilian moved on from a fight against him after it seemed it was never going to happen.

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“[I] came here tonight and showed that I belong in the best company of MMA. I want my contract!” Burns told Usman to a chorus of cheers from his local South Florida fans, teammates, and students.

UFC president Dana White, who was in attendance for the Titan FC 54 show as part of his viral series, ‘Lookin’ for a Fight’, agreed with Burns. Following Burns’ one-sided win, White tendered the Brazilian a summer showdown opportunity on the Contender Series.

Burns, 31, turned to his grappling roots to get the job done against Gomez. While he wanted to strike more than he did, Burns says an injury in training prompted him to engage his jiu jitsu early, and the result speaks for itself.

“I was training with the [Titan FC] featherweight title challenger, Caio Uruguai, and then we were doing some grappling drills,” Burns told The Body Lock. “I was going to his back, and he was trying to whizzer my shoulder, and accidentally he cut my forehead. So, I had to change the strategy to a little bit more conservative.

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